“Every CM does it”: Delhi High Court hears Arguments Against Use of Soldiers, Civil Servants, and PM Selfie Points to Advertise Government Initiatives

“Should a welfare program that exists not be made more widely known? The Court stated that advertisements frequently feature images of prime ministers or chief ministers.

The Delhi High Court stated on Monday that there didn’t appear to be anything fundamentally wrong with the government using defense and civil servants to promote its programs.

Additionally, the Court granted the Ministry of Defence’s directive to set up selfie stations at various defense facilities and sainik schools in order to highlight the accomplishments of the MoD preliminary approval.

The Indian Army and NDRF performed an outstanding job when miners were trapped in Uttarakhand. Nobody should be able to complain, in my opinion, if the Army wants to make selfie points more common. If I were to see a selfie point regarding pension benefits, I would immediately ask, “What is the benefit?” The Court questioned, “Would it not lead to “debate or enquiry” on this aspect?”

Regarding the matter of utilizing the prime minister’s images at these locations for self-portraits, the Court stated.

Is this not the standard? Every single Chief Minister is using their images [in advertisements]?”

A public interest litigation (PIL) petition opposing the use of defense personnel and civil servants to advance government programs and policies was being heard by the court.

The plea sought for the revocation of two government orders: one from the Ministry of Defense instructing the Army, Navy, and Air Force to erect selfie stations featuring Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s image to highlight MoD accomplishments, and another from the Department of Personnel and Training directing the deployment of Joint Secretaries, Directors, and Deputy Secretaries as District Rath Prabharis to highlight the accomplishments of the last nine years of the Indian government.

The case was scheduled for January 4, 2024, and the Central government counsel was asked to seek instructions. The bench consisting of Acting Chief Justice (ACJ) Manmohan and Justice Mini Pushkarna heard the Petition.

First, the Court questioned the rationale behind not popularizing a welfare program.

“Should a welfare program that exists not be made more widely known? The Court stated that advertisements frequently feature images of prime ministers or chief ministers.

The Court stated that only schemes from the previous nine years were highlighted.

“Everyone wants to know about the newest government initiatives. The Prime Minister’s Museum serves as a good resource for anyone interested in learning about events that occurred fifty years ago.

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